In a life threatening emergency dial Triple Zero (000)

In a life threatening emergency dial Triple Zero (000)
ACT Public Hospitals

Canberra Hospital

5124 0000


Calvary Hospital

6201 6111

Mental Health

Call Mental Health Triage on

1800 629 354

(free call except from mobiles or public phones) or

6205 1065

Poisons Hotline

For a poison emergency in Australia call

131126

Drug and Alcohol Help Line

The Drug and Alcohol Help Line is available 24-hours, 7 days a week on

5124 9977

Health Protection Service

For after hours urgent public health matters including environmental health, radiation safety, food poisoning and communicable disease management phone:

(02) 6205 1700

healthdirect

24 hour health advice

1800 022 222

ACT State Emergency Service

Emergency help
during flood or storms

132 500

Service providers


The role of a General Practitioner

A General Practitioner (GP) has a key role in supporting a person's recovery from motor accident injuries.

A patient applying for personal injury benefits under the MAI scheme may ask you to complete a medical report to accompany their personal injury application. In completing the report, you will also be asked to agree to be the treating doctor nominated for the ongoing management and coordination of your patient's treatment and recovery from their motor accident injuries.

During the COVID-19 Pandemic a medical report may be completed through a telehealth consultation and a desk top review of your patient's medical records, if you consider this is appropriate.

The medical report includes an assessment of your patient's injuries, initial treatment recommendations and details of any referrals you make to other health practitioners. If your patient was in paid work before the accident you will also need to complete the fitness for work section of the medical report. You will also have ongoing obligations with respect to fitness for work certificates.

The fitness for work certificate is a primary tool for you to communicate with your patient and an insurer about your patient's treatment and recovery. You should discuss with your patient whether information in the certificate for the insurer may also be shared with their employer. A fitness for work certificate should generally only be given for a prospective period of up to one month unless clinical reasoning supports a longer period. A current certificate will be required from a nominated treating doctor or practice to cover any period your patient is receiving income replacement under the MAI scheme. You should therefore schedule review appointments with your patient before the expiry of any certificate you provide.

In light of the COVID-19 Pandemic an insurer may approach a GP to discuss the appropriateness of issuing a fitness for work certificate for a period of longer than one month to reduce risks to you and your patient from a physical consultation. You may also issue a fitness for work certificate following a telehealth consultation and desk top review of your patient's medical records if you consider this appropriate.

An MAI insurer may contact you to obtain further information about your patient's injuries and treatment to support their personal injuries application. Your patient will have given consent for their personal and health information to be disclosed to the insurer when completing their personal injuries application form.

If your patient is more seriously injured, an insurer will prepare a recovery plan for their ongoing reasonable and necessary treatment and care. A draft recovery plan will be prepared for a patient unable to resume their pre-injury duties and activities within 28 days of an insurer receiving their personal injury application.

An MAI insurer will develop a recovery plan in consultation with you and your patient and also any other health service provider involved in their treatment as appropriate. You will be given an opportunity to review a draft plan and to make recommendations to the insurer about reasonable and necessary treatment and care to be included in the plan. You will also be given a copy of the final recovery plan.

The role of other treating health practitioners

As a medical specialist or allied health practitioner you will be part of your patient’s treating team.

An MAI insurer may contact you to obtain further information about your patient’s injuries and reasonable and necessary treatment to support their personal injuries application. You may also be asked for input into the development of a recovery plan for your patient. Your patient will have given consent for their personal and health information to be disclosed to the insurer when completing their personal injury application form.

If you are nominated as a provider of services in a recovery plan you will receive a copy of the final plan. The plan will also set out payment arrangements for your services.

Payment for your services

The MAI insurer will be responsible for payment for services, that are reasonable and necessary, that you perform in relation to a personal injuries application that are accepted by the insurer. There is no set schedule of fees for your services, however in approving a treatment and care expense an insurer will consider recommended rates or charges for members of a professional association (e.g. AMA rates), availability and charges of like providers in your location and your area of specialisation, skills and experience. An insurer may contact you about billing arrangements, particularly where there may be ongoing treatment associated with your patient.

Early treatment expenses

An MAI insurer can reimburse an injured person for some initial treatment expenses they incur before completing a personal injury application.  These are:

  • 2 consultations with a GP, being no higher than a level B consultation for initial treatment and a further consultation no higher than a level C consultation to prepare the medical report for their application; and
  • 2 allied health treatment sessions, on referral by a registered medical practitioner, with each session being capped at $150 for reimbursement.

An injured person can also be reimbursed for further treatment expenses they incur while they are waiting for their personal injuries application to be assessed by an insurer. These are known as allowable expenses as they can be reimbursed without prior approval and even if the insurer does not subsequently
accept liability for a personal injuries application.

The insurer can reimburse an injured person for up to:

  • 4 consultations with a GP, up to a level C consultation; and
  • 8 allied health treatment sessions, following referral from a registered medical practitioner, with up to 4 sessions for any one service (such as physiotherapy or psychology) with each session being capped at $150 for reimbursement.

All other outstanding treatment and care expenses (including for any amounts in excess of capped amounts already reimbursed) will require insurer approval that they were reasonable and necessary and can be paid once an insurer accepts liability for a personal injuries application.


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